Badminton Australia Anti-Doping and Anti-Match Fixing Policy

Written by  Tuesday, 17 April 2012 01:23

Badminton Australia’s revised Anti-Doping Policy comes into effect 1 January 2015.


Click here to view the policy.


The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) has recently warned all Australian athletes and coaches about the banned stimulant methylhexaneamine, following a spate of positive doping tests both in Australia and overseas.


Click here to view the ASC information sheet.


BWF Anti-Doping Policy

Click here to view the current BWF Anti-Doping policy. (See Part III, Section 1B, Appendix 3)


Anti-doping Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

The information below is a brief overview of anti-doping issues. The questions and answers have been prepared with all care possible, however you should refer directly to the Badminton Australia Anti-doping Policy and the BWF Anti-Doping Policy (See Part III, Section 1B, Appendix 3) for more information.


For information about anti-doping issues and guidance for athletes, visit the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) website www.asada.gov.au or contact the athlete Hotline 1800 020 506.


For more information, go to the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) website www.wada-ama.org


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

1. What is Badminton Australia’s position on doping?

2. Where can I get a copy of the BA Anti-Doping Policy?

3. Who does the Badminton Australia Policy apply to?

4. Does the BWF have an Anti-Doping Policy?

5. When does the BWF Anti-Doping Policy apply?

6. What is the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA)?

7. What is the WADA Code?

8. What is the purpose of the WADA Code?

9. Is the BWF a signatory to the Code?

10. Do governments support the Code?

11. What obligations do players have under the BA Policy?

12. What obligations do support personal of players have under the BA Policy?

13. What obligations does BA have under the Policy?

14. What is the Prohibited List?

15. What are Anti-Doping Rule Violations?

16. What are the sanctions (punishments) for Anti-Doping Rule Violations?

17. Where can testing take place?

18. What kind of testing takes place?

19. What is a Registered Testing Pool?

20. What is an International Level Player?

21. What is a National Level Player?

22. What if I have to take some medications?

23. What if I have Asthma?

24. Are dietary Supplements like protein powder ok?

25. What kind of whereabouts Information do I need to provide?

26. What is I want to retire from competition?

27. What recent legislative changes have occurred in Australia?


1. What is Badminton Australia’s position on doping?

Badminton Australia (BA) "condemns the Use of performance enhancing drugs and Doping practices in sport. The Use of performance enhancing drugs and Doping practices is contrary to the ethics of sport and potentially harmful to the health of Players". (BA Anti-Doping Policy - June 2004).


2. Where can I get a copy of the BA Anti-Doping Policy?

You can download a copy of the Badminton Australia Anti-Doping Policy from our website or if you would like a copy contact the BA office – (03) 9397 4722 – or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


3. Who does the Badminton Australia Policy apply to?

The Policy applies to all players and support personal, Members, volunteers, employees and contractors of BA. These people agree to be bound by the Anti-Doping Policy as a condition of their participation in the sport. It is their responsibility to read, understand and follow the rules contained in the Policy.


4. Does the BWF have an Anti-Doping Policy?

Yes – the BWF Anti-doping Policy is similar to the BA Policy and meets all the requirements of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). You can download a copy of the Policy from their website. This came into force on 1 July 2004. See www.internationalbadminton.org


5. When does the BWF Anti-Doping Policy apply?

This Policy applies to all BWF sanctioned events – in other words if you are playing in one of the 3 BWF sanctioned International events held every year in Australia, you will come under the BWF Policy since the event is sanctioned by the BWF – and that is the same for any BWF events overseas (check the wording on the entry forms).


6. What is the World-Anti Doping Agency (WADA)?

WADA is the world peak body for anti-doping, anti-doping policy development, education, testing and results management. They set the standards under which all sports operate with regards to anti-doping policies and procedures. See www.wada-ama.org One of the most important frameworks in the WADA Anti-Doping Program is the WADA Code.


7. What is the WADA Code?

The Code brings all world sports into line under the one common set of guidelines, obligations, testing, education and results management procedures. The Code is the key document in the World Anti-doping Program. The Program consists of three levels – The Code (level 1), International Standards (level 2) and Models of Best Practice (level 3).


8. What is the purpose of the WADA Code?

The Code aims to harmonize anti-doping regulations, policies and procedures across ALL sports and ALL countries of the world. The Code is a core document that provides a framework for anti-doping policies, rules and regulations within sports organizations and among public authorities.


9. Is the BWF a signatory to the Code?

Yes - the BWF is a signatory to the Code and their new Code compliant Policy came into affect on 1 July 2004. All BWF events (including the three annual IBF sanctioned Internationals in Australia) are run under the BWF Anti-doping Policy which supports the Code. You can download a copy of the BWF Policy from their website. See www.internationalbadminton.org


10. Do governments support the Code?

Yes - our Federal Government, the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) and the Australian Sports Commission (ASC) are all signatories to the Code. Most governments around the world signed up to the Code in 2003. Most international sports governing bodies have signed the Code. All Australian sports who receive Government funding are required to be compliant with the Code.


11. What obligations do players have under the BA Policy?

Below is only a brief summary. Go to the BA Policy and read it for a complete understanding of your obligations. The player has many obligations under the Policy.


Generally – if you are a player you must;


  • understand and comply with the anti-doping rules/policies that apply to you;
  • read and understand the Prohibited List (see below);
  • make yourself available for sample collection and provide whereabouts information if you are on a Registered Testing Pool (see below);
  • take full responsibility for what you ingest and use;
  • inform medical personnel of your obligations not to use Prohibited Substances and/or Prohibited Methods;
  • make sure that any medical treatment received does not violate any anti-doping policies and rules applicable to you.


12. What obligations do support personal of players have under the BA Policy?

Below is only a brief summary. Go to the Policy and read it for a complete understanding of your obligations.


Generally – if you support players you must:

  • be knowledgeable of and comply with all anti-doping policies and rules applicable to you or the players you support;
  • cooperate with ASADA testing and field officers;
  • use your influence on Players’ values and behaviour to foster anti-doping attitudes.


13. What obligations does BA have under the Policy?

Below is only a brief summary. Go to the Policy and read it for a complete understanding of your obligations.


Generally – Badminton Australia must:


  • use its best efforts to assist Players to fulfil their responsibilities under these Anti-Doping Rules;
  • support and assist Anti-Doping Organisations to conduct Doping Control;
  • make these Anti-Doping Rules readily available - to Members, Players, Player Support Personnel;
  • develop and implement, in consultation with ASDA and BWF, drug education for Players and Player Support Personnel;
  • support the initiatives of the ASC, ASADA, BWF and AOC to stop doping in sport;
  • adopt and implement anti-doping policies and rules which conform with the Code, BWF, AOC and ASC;
  • co-operate with ASC and any other relevant Anti-Doping Organisation in relation to the conduct of any investigation or hearing into an alleged Anti-Doping Rule Violation;
  • require as a condition of membership that the policies, rules and programs of Member organisations comply with the Code, BWF, ASC and these Anti-Doping Rules;
  • require all Players and Player Support Personnel within its jurisdiction to recognise and be bound by anti-doping rules which comply with the Code, BWF, ASC and BA’s Anti-Doping Rules;
  • require Player(s) who are not Members of BA or one of its Member organisations to be available for Sample collection and provide accurate and up-to-date whereabouts information if required by the conditions for eligibility established by BA, BWF or any Major Event Organisation as applicable;
  • not disclose or use any information about a person who is alleged to have, or has, committed an Anti-Doping Rule Violation until after the conclusion of the hearing, except (for a purpose under the BA rules) to the ASC, AOC, ASADA, BWF or any other relevant Ant-Doping.


14. What is the Prohibited List?

This is the list identifying the Prohibited Substances and Prohibited Methods. This list is published and updated from time to time by WADA. You can see a copy of the list at www.WADA-ama.org. The list changes on 1 January each year. It is the athlete’s responsibility to be aware of the changes to the list. It is also important to be aware that a medication you checked in one year may have a different status the next year – so keep up with changes. This is the athlete’s responsibility.


15. What are Anti-Doping Rule Violations?

The following constitute Anti-Doping Rule Violations (see the BA Policy for details of these):


  • The presence of a Prohibited Substance or its Metabolites or Markers in a Player's bodily Specimen;
  • Use or Attempted Use of a Prohibited Substance or a Prohibited Method;
  • Refusing, or failing without compelling justification, to submit to Sample collection;
  • Violation of the requirements regarding Player availability for Out-of Competition Testing including failure to provide whereabouts required information and missed tests;
  • Tampering, or Attempting to tamper, with any part of Doping Control;
  • Possession of Prohibited Substances and Methods;
  • Trafficking in any Prohibited Substance or Prohibited Method;
  • Administration or Attempted administration of a Prohibited Substance or Prohibited Method to any Player, or assisting, encouraging, aiding, abetting, covering up or any other type of complicity involving an Anti-Doping Rule Violation or any Attempted violation;
  • Assisting, encouraging, aiding, abetting, conspiring, covering up or any other type of intentional complicity involving an Anti-Doping Rule Violation or attempted Anti-Doping Rule Violation by another person;
  • Association in a professional or sport-related capacity with a person serving a period of ineligibility for an Anti-Doping Rule Violation, or a person not subject to a sport policy who has been convicted or in a criminal, disciplinary or professional proceeding to have engaged in conduct which would have been an Anti-Doping Rule Violation.


16. What are the sanctions (punishments) for Anti-Doping Rule Violations?

The sanctions (punishments) received by athletes / support people / staff / administrators for Rule Violations will vary according to rule and the context of the violation. The Rule Violation may lead to disqualification of results, the forfeiture of all medals, points, prizes and up to lifetime ineligibility in the sport – depending on the Rule Violation. Please see the BA Anti-Doping Policy for the details.


17. Where can testing take place?

There are two types of testing – In Competition (at tournaments) and Out of Competition testing (at other times). All players affiliated to Badminton Australia / Members of State Associations / clubs / associations can be tested without advanced notice.


Testing can happen at a tournament (In Competition Testing) or during the year when you are not at a tournament (Out of Competition Testing) – at training, at home etc. Out of competition testing is mostly restricted to athletes on the Registered Testing Pool (see below) but all athletes are subject to in-competition testing at Badminton Australia / BWF sanctioned tournaments.


18. What kind of testing takes place?

There is a very strict procedure for taking samples for testing. Please see the ASADA website for the procedure – look under “athlete resources”. There are two kinds of samples – urine samples which has been done for many years and now blood samples. Athletes from all sports now need to be aware that in addition to urine samples they can and may be asked to provide a blood sample. The process is almost exactly the same as urine samples. The athlete will be selected for testing, choose their kits and do the test. The only real difference is that the test is performed by a phlebotomist.


The entire process can be found under athlete resources on the ASADA website.


19. What is a Registered Testing Pool?

This is a list of athletes who play at either the national or international level. The BWF keeps a list of international players on its Registered Testing Pool. Badminton Australia keeps a list of athletes who compete at the national level. These are on a Registered Testing Pool of National players – and this list is put together by BA and ASADA. Players will get a letter from ASADA when they first go on the Registered Testing Pool.


Players on a Registered Testing Pool must provide information on where they will be each quarter (whereabouts information) – so that a testing officer knows where you are if they wish to take a sample for analysis.


20. What is an International Level Player?

Players designated by the BWF as being within the BWF Registered Testing Pool.


21. What is a National Level Player?

Top level national players in Australia who are not part of the BWF Registered Testing Pool (RTP) but are on the ASADA RTP. National level players are designated by Badminton Australia and ASADA as being within the BA / ASADA Registered Testing Pool of national players.


22. What if I have to take medication?

Players are responsible for EVERYTHING they ingest. Some common prescribed and over-the-counter medications have Prohibited Substances. Tell you doctor that you are an elite athlete BEFORE any medication is prescribed. The doctor will have access to the Prohibited List of banned substances for athletes. Before you purchase over-the-counter medications call the ASADA hotline for information about the product. Remember the Prohibited List changes each year and a medication you have used before which was not on the list one year - may be on the list another year - so check this.


Players with a documented medical condition who require the use of a medication containing Prohibited Substance or a Prohibited Method must first obtain permission to use the medication by completing a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) form and applying through ASADA. See www.asada.gov.au (go to athlete resources for more information of Therapeutic Use Exemptions).


Permission must be granted BEFORE you use any medications which contain Prohibited Substances. Tell you doctor that you are an athlete who is subject to drug testing. Contact the ASADA athlete Hotline and get assistance - 1800 020 506.


This is YOUR responsibility.


23. What if I have asthma?

Some common prescribed and over-the-counter medications have Prohibited Substances – including many asthma medications and anti-inflammatory medications such as creams, sprays etc. Players are responsible for everything that they ingest – food, supplements, medications etc.


Players with a documented medical condition who require the use of a Prohibited Substance or a Prohibited Method for the treatment of asthma must first obtain permission to use these. See more information www.asada.gov.au (click under 'athlete resources') of the Abbreviated Therapeutic Use Exemption (ATUE) process - this process also applies to Glucocorticosteroids contained in some strong anti-inflammatory medications such as skin creams, eye drops, ear drops and nasal sprays.


Permission must be granted BEFORE you use such medications which contain Prohibited Substances. Permission must be granted BEFORE you use any medication which contain prohibited substances. Tell your doctor that you are an athlete who is subject to drug testing. Contact the ASADA athlete Hotline and get assistance - 1800 020 506.


24. Are dietary Supplements like protein powder ok?

A lot of athletes take supplements and this is an area of concern. ASADA is not able to guarantee the status of supplement products – that is to say, ASADA cannot give an athlete the all clear to take any supplement product – even something like vitamins or protein powders. This is because supplement products do not go through the same manufacturing process as pharmaceutical products – so once supplement products are manufactured, there is no checking done on them to determine that what is listed on the label is exactly what’s in the product. There have been many instances where supplements have been found to be contaminated with other products and even instances where these contaminants have been found to be prohibited substances.


In fact a study in the USA in 2001 found that 15% of the 600 products they tested contained a prohibited substance. Certainly more recently in the USA the USADA lab tested 5 products on the market and all 5 of them contained an anabolic steroid!


Athletes need to be aware that a positive test is a strict liability offence, so even if a prohibited substance was to get into their bodies through a contaminated supplement, they would still have an Anti-doping Rule Violation processed against them.


Whilst a substance like whey protein or vitamin B is permitted in its pure form, there is never any way to ensure that it is in its pure form. Call the ASADA hotline for advice.


25. What kind of whereabouts Information do I need to provide?

If you are on a Registered Testing Pool you must provide accurate whereabouts information to the BWF / ASADA / BA. This information must be kept updated at all times so if your training plan or tournament plan changes – you must inform ASADA and BA. This is the player’s responsibility. Players who do not meet certain requirements around whereabouts information may have committed an Anti-Doping Rule Violation. Each player on the Registered Testing Pool is responsible for providing whereabouts information.


26. What if I want to retire from competition?

A player who has been identified by BWF for inclusion in the BWF Registered Testing Pool shall be subject to BWF retirement and return to Competition rules. A Player who has been identified by BA for inclusion in its (national) Registered Testing Pool shall be subject to the following anti-doping rules.


1) A player must notify BA in writing if they wish to retire – and come off the Registered Testing Pool List.

2) The player’s retirement date will be the date BA receives the notice.

3) The player must not compete again for at least six months and if they wish to, must request reinstatement.

4) The player must request in writing to BA to be reinstated and be available for testing.

5) The player must be available for out-of-competition testing (without notice) for six months before playing in competitions.

6) Reinstatement is at the discretion of BA.

27. What recent legislative changes have occurred in Australia?

In March 2006, new legislation came into effect.


The Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority (ASADA) is the peak anti-doping authority which was established earlier this year replacing the Australian Sports Drug Agency (ASDA). Under new legislation passed before the Commonwealth Games in March 2006. ASADA has the power to "deter, detect and present cases at tribunals against athletes and their support personnel found in breach of Australia's anti-doping rules".


The legislative framework under which ASADA operates is the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Act (2006) and the Australian Sports Anti-Doping Authority Regulations (2006).


This new peak bodyalso takes on the roles of testing, education and advocacy which were formally carried out by ASDA and it now incorporates the functions of the Australian Sports Medical Advisory Committee (ASDMAC).


Changes to federal legislation which took place in March 2006 allows ASADA to:


1) Investigate alleged anti-doping rule violations;

2) Publicly name athletes (following relevant tribunal processes) who record a valid doping infraction;

3) Deal with new anti-doping rule violations relating to athletes who deliberately evade testing, who tamper with ASADA’s processes, or who fail to provide ASADA with accurate contact information to allow no advance drug testing to occur;

4) Obtain and disseminate additional drug testing information to domestic and international sports federations;

5) Recognize WADA and the Codes various international standards.

6) Conduct testing in and out of competition and;

7) Deliver educational services;


Anti-Match Fixing Policy

Download the Anti-Match Fixing Policy Template.


Rate this item
(0 votes)

Facebook



Sponsors & Partners

sponsor_bwf.jpg
sponsor_aoc2.jpg
sponsor_ais.jpg
sponsor_asc.jpg
sponsor_cga2.jpg
sponsor_bo.jpg
sponsor_teq.jpg
sponsor_nsw.jpg
sponsor_dnsw.jpg
sponsor_lining.jpg
sponsor_para.jpg
sponsor_yonex.jpg